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    1. Start by binding your partners wrist behind their back using a Single Column Tie or Somerville Bowline.
      1. Make sure the bottom of their wrist face outwards to help reduce pressure on the Ulnar Nerve.
      2. Upper Torso Bindings
        1. Pass the rope along the left upper arm around the upper chest.
          1. Cross the rope creating a stem from the wrists, and pass it back around the right upper arm above your first wrap.
            1. Lock off around the stem.
            2. Perform a pair of Kannukis following the direction of the rope to prevent them from slipping over the shoulder.
              1. Extend your rope if needed.
                1. Lower Torso Bindings
                  1. Start a couple inches below your first set of wraps minding the Radial Nerve and pass around under the breast line.
                    1. Cross the rope with the stem, and pass back around the same way you did the upper bindings.
                      1. Join ropes locking off around the stem.
                      2. Burn up unused rope.

                        A One Rope Gote Shibari Tutorial

                        One of the most popular chest harnesses in rope bondage is the Gote Shibari. It is often mistaken for the Takate Kote. An easy way to tell them a part is the arm placement behind the back. The Gote Shibari keeps the arms parallel to the floor while the Takate Kote place the arms further up the back forming an X-shape. To add to your brain cells confusion, both are often referred to as a Box tie. — Don’t worry your pretty little bunny slippers.— You would not be mistaken to refer to either of them in this way.

                        The Gote Shibari is one of the principal ties new rope bondage practitioners want to learn and is one of the most popular techniques that have come out of Japanese Kinbaku. Since it is a very common in Kinbaku, it has many variants as it does riggers. Each artist likes to adapt it to their own style. You can often tell just from the style who performed the Box tie. No matter who ties it, they all start with hands behind the back. It is commonly used for floor work and suspensions.

                        Do to its inherent dangers of causing nerve damage — Wrist drop is real! — it is often avoided for suspensions. Especially side suspensions when most of the body weight is placed on the upper chest wraps. The weight of your bunny often presses in to the Radial nerve of the arm. — This is bad black magic voodoo because you don’t know until its to late! — You will never be able to reduce all the inherent dangers of the Gote Shibari, you can only help mitigate this issue by being mindful of the compression on the arms and wrist. Adding more slack to the wrist will reduce pressure on the Ulnar nerve and placement of chest wraps is key in avoiding the Radial nerve. Both of these are a case by case basis. Everyone is built differently which makes placement and danger zones different on Everyone. Always practice responsibly and under the guidance of a local professional. Watching online video tutorials will not teach you everything you need to know. It is your responsibility to learn from a real life professional.